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The 2013 judges

One of the great strengths of The Sunday Times EFG Short Story Award is the quality and experience of its judging panels which have featured an array of outstanding writers.


Andrew Holgate

Andrew Holgate

Andrew Holgate has been the Literary Editor of The Sunday Times since 2008. Amongst many other prizes and awards, he has previously been a judge for the Samuel Johnson Prize, the Orwell Prize, the Somerset Maugham Awards and the Betty Trask Prize. He is also a member of the Folio Prize Academy.


Matthew Evans

Matthew Evans

Matthew Evans is the Award’s non-voting Chair of Judges. Lord Evans CBE is the former Chairman of EFG Private Bank. Prior to joining EFG, Lord Evans was a junior government minister in the House of Lords, Chairman of Faber & Faber and Vice Chairman of the British Film Institute. He is also President of the British Antique Dealers’ Association.

Photograph © Ian Gavan/Getty Images


Andrew O'Hagan

Andrew O'Hagan

Andrew O'Hagan was born in Glasgow in 1968. His first book, The Missing, was published in 1995 and shortlisted for theEsquire/Waterstone's/Apple Non-Fiction Award. Our Fathers, his debut novel, was shortlisted for the 1999 Booker Prize. His second novel, Personality, was published in 2003 and won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Fiction. In January of that year Granta named him one of the 'Best of Young British Novelists' and in April he received the E. M. Forster Award from the American Academy of Arts & Letters. O'Hagan's prize-winning books were joined in 2010 by The Atlantic Ocean, an acclaimed book of essays. He has written for the stage, is a contributing editor to the London Review of Books and a Fellow of King's College.


Lionel Shriver

Lionel Shriver

Lionel Shriver is the author of ten novels. She is best known for the New York Times bestsellers So Much for That (a finalist for the 2010 National Book Award and the Wellcome Trust Book Prize) and The Post-Birthday World (Entertainment Weekly’s Book of the Year and one of Time’s top ten for 2007), as well as the international bestseller We Need to Talk About Kevin. The 2005 Orange Prize winner, We Need to Talk About Kevin passed the million-copies-sold mark several years ago, and was adapted for an award-winning feature film by Lynne Ramsay in 2011. Both Kevin and So Much for That have been dramatized for BBC Radio 4. Shriver’s work has been translated into 28 languages. Currently a columnist for Standpoint, she is a widely published journalist who writes for the Guardian, The New York Times, The Sunday Times, the Financial Times, and the Wall Street Journal, among many other publications. Her eleventh novel, Big Brother, is published in spring of 2013.


Joanna Trollope

Joanna Trollope

Joanna Trollope has been writing for over thirty years: she first wrote a number of historical novels now published under Caroline Harvey, then Britannia’s Daughters - a study of women in the British Empire and more recently, her enormously successful contemporary works of fiction, several of which have been televised. The Choir was her first contemporary novel, followed by A Village Affair and A Passionate Man. The Rector's Wife was her first number one bestseller, and made her into a household name. Since then she has written eleven more contemporary novels: The Men and the Girls, A Spanish Lover, The Best of Friends, Next of Kin, Other People’s Children, Marrying the Mistress, Girl from the South and Brother and Sister, Second Honeymoon, Friday Nights, The Other Family and the newly published Daughters in Law.


Sarah Waters

Sarah Waters

Sarah Waters was born in Wales in 1966. She has a Ph.D in English Literature and has been an associate lecturer with the Open University. She won the Betty Trask Award, the Somerset Maugham Award, was shortlisted twice for the Mail on Sunday/John Llewellyn Rhys Award and the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year in 2000. Fingersmith, her third novel, was shortlisted for both the Orange Prize and the Man Booker Prize, and won the CWA Ellis Peters Dagger Award for Historical Crime Fiction and The South Bank Show Award for Literature. In 2002, she was named Author of the Year three times: by the British Book Awards, by The Booksellers’ Association and Waterstones Booksellers. She was chosen as one of Granta’s Best of Young British Novelists in 2003. Her fourth novel, The Night Watch, was shortlisted for The Man Booker Prize and The Orange Prize in 2006. Here most recent novel, The Little Stranger, was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 2009.

Fingersmith and Tipping the Velvet have both been adapted for BBC TV and Affinity from ITV, in 2008. The Night Watch appeared on our screens in 2011, as a one-off drama, from BBC 2, adapted by award winning British writer, Paula Milne and starring Anna Maxwell Martin.