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The 2017 longlist

Fourteen authors have made it onto the longlist for the 2017 Sunday Times EFG Short Story Award. The shortlist of six will be announced on March 19, and the winner will be announced at a gala dinner at Stationers’ Hall in London on Thursday, April 27.


Christine Dwyer Hickey

Christine Dwyer Hickey

With their story: 'Back to Bones'

Born in Dublin, Christine Dwyer Hickey has written seven novels, the most recent of which is The Lives of Women (Atlantic Books UK, 2015), a play, and a short story collection, The House on Parkgate Street and other Dublin Stories (New Island Books, 2013). Her story On Christmas Eve Night was broadcast on RTE Radio One and After the Fourth War appeared in The Irish Times (2016). A former private detective, she has been a full-time writer since 1992, twice-winning the Listowel Writers’ Week short story competition and also in 1993 won the Penguin/Observer short story competition. Her novel The Cold Eye of Heaven (Atlantic Books, 2011) was Irish Novel of the Year in 2012. She is married with three grown-up children and divides her time between Dublin and Italy.


Daisy Johnson

Daisy Johnson

With their story: 'Blood Rites'

British writer Daisy Johnson was born in 1990, studying English Literature and Creative Writing at Lancaster and Creative Writing at Oxford. Her debut short story collection, Fen, was published by Cape and in the US by Graywolf. Her novel, Eggtooth (Cape), is due in 2017. She was the winner of the AM Heath Prize and the Harper Bazaar short story prize. Her short fiction has appeared in the Boston Review and the Warwick Review and she also publishes poetry. Daisy currently lives in Oxford with her partner.


Kevn Wilson

Kevin Wilson

With their story: 'Door to Door'

Kevin Wilson was born in Sewanee, Tennessee, and is the author of a story collection, Tunneling to the Center of the Earth, which won the Shirley Jackson Award, and two novels, The Family Fang and Perfect Little World. His stories have appeared in One Story, Tin House, A Public Space, Ploughshares, and elsewhere. He has received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, Rivendell, and the KHN Center for the Arts. He lives in Sewanee, with his wife, the poet Leigh Anne Couch, and his sons, where he is an Associate Professor in the English Department at Sewanee: The University of the South


Anjali Joseph

Anjali Joseph

With their story: 'Everlasting Lucifer'

Anjali Joseph was born in Bombay. She read English at Trinity College, Cambridge, has taught English at the Sorbonne, and has written for the Times of India in Bombay. She was commissioning editor of Elle India. Saraswati Park, her first novel, was published in 2010. It won the Betty Trask Prize and the Desmond Elliott Prize, and was joint winner of India’s Vodafone Crossword Book Award for Fiction, as well as being shortlisted for the Commonwealth Prize for Best First Book, the Ondaatje Prize, and the Hindu Literary Prize. Another Country, her second novel, was published in 2012 and was longlisted for the Man Asian Literary Prize. The Living, a third novel, appeared in 2016.


Celeste Ng

Celeste Ng

With their story: 'Every Little Thing'

Celeste Ng is the author of the novel Everything I Never Told You (Blackfriars/Little, Brown UK), which was a New York Times bestseller, a New York Times Notable Book of 2014, Amazon’s number 1 Best Book of 2014, and was named a best book of the year by over a dozen U.S. publications. Everything I Never Told You was also the winner of the Massachusetts Book Award, the Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature, and the American Library Association’s Alex Award, and has been translated into over twenty languages. Celeste has also been awarded the Pushcart Prize, the Hopwood Award, and a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. Her second novel, Little Fires Everywhere, will be published in September 2017 by Little, Brown UK. Celeste grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Shaker Heights, Ohio, in a family of scientists. She has taught writing at the University of Michigan and Grub Street in Boston and currently lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with her husband and son.


Bret Anthony-Johnston

Bret Anthony Johnston

With their story: 'Half of What Atlee Rouse Knows About Horses'

American writer Bret Anthony-Johnston is the author of the internationally bestselling novel Remember Me Like This, which was featured on BBC4’s Books at Bedtime series, was named a Notable Book of the Year by The New York Times Book Review, and is being made into a major motion picture. He also wrote the multi-award-winning short story collection Corpus Christi: Stories, which was named a Best Book of the Year by The Independent and The Irish Times, and was shortlisted for Ireland’s Frank O’Connor International Short Fiction Prize. A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, he has received awards from the Natinal Endowment for the Arts, the National Book Foundation, the Pushcart Prize, the Virginia Quarterly Review and elsewhere. His work has appeared in Virginia Quarterly Review, Esquire, Glimmer Train Stories, The New York Times Magazine, The Paris Review, American Short Fiction and The Atlantic. He wrote the documentary Waiting for Lightning, which was released in theatres around the world, and he is the Director of Creative Writing at Harvard University. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.


Elizabeth McCracken

Elizabeth McCracken

With their story: 'Mistress Mickle All At Sea'

Born in Boston, Elizabeth McCracken is the author of five books: Here’s Your Hat What’s Your Hurry (stories), two novels (The Giant’s House and Niagara Falls All Over Again), the memoir An Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination, and Thunderstruck & Other Stories. She has received grants and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Liguria Study Centre, the American Academy in Berlin, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. She taught creative writing at Western Michigan University, the University of Oregon, the University of Houston and the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop. She holds the James A. Michener Chair in Fiction at the University of Texas, Austin.


Sally Rooney.jpg

Sally Rooney

With their story: 'Mr Salary'

Sally Rooney was born in the west of Ireland in 1991. She lives and works in Dublin, where she graduated from Trinity College with a BA in English Literature and an MPhil in Literatures of the Americas. Her work has appeared in Granta, The White Review, The Dublin Review, Winter Papers and The Stinging Fly. Her debut novel, Conversations with Friends, is forthcoming in twelve territories worldwide, and will be published by Faber & Faber in June 2017.


Lisa McInerney

Lisa McInerney

With their story: 'Navigation'

Lisa McInerney’s debut novel The Glorious Heresies (John Murray, 2015) won the 2016 Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction and the 2016 Desmond Elliott Prize. It was shortlisted for Best Newcomer at the 2015 Irish Book Awards, longlisted for the 2016 Dylan Thomas Award, and named as a 2015 book of the year by The Irish Times, Sunday Independent and Sunday Business Post. It has been optioned for television by Fifty Fathoms with Julian Farino to direct; Lisa will write the adaptation. Her second novel, The Blood Miracles, will be published by John Murray in April 2017. Recent publications include the short story Redoubt for BBC Radio 4 in December 2015, the short story Berghain for the anthology The Long Gaze Back (New Island 2015), and the short story Saturday, Boring for the anthology Town and Country (Faber & Faber, 2013). She lives in Galway with her husband and 15-year-old daughter.


Kathleen Alcott

Kathleen Alcott

With their story: 'Reputation Management'

Born in 1988 and raised by two journalists, American writer Kathleen Alcott is the author of the novels The Dangers of Proximal Alphabets and Infinite Home, the first of which was published in the United States when she was twenty-three. Infinite Home, released in 2015, was nominated for The Kirkus Prize and shortlisted for The Chautuaqua Prize. Her journalism has appeared in outlets including The Guardian, The New York Times, and The New Yorker, and her short fiction has been listed as notable by The Best American Short Stories. A native of Northern California, she divides her time between there and New York City, where she serves as an adjunct professor at Columbia University.


Richard Lambert

Richard Lambert

With their story: 'The Hazel Twig and the Olive Tree'

British writer Richard Lambert is a poet and novelist, and a graduate of the MA in Creative Writing at UEA. His poetry collection Night Journey was published in 2012 and he is the recipient of an Arts Council award to write a new collection, The Nameless Places. Individual poems have appeared in The Spectator, the TLS, Poetry Review, Poetry Ireland Review, PN Review, The Rialto, and The Forward Anthology 2014. His novel The Wolf Road was longlisted for this year’s Caledonia Novel Award for unpublished debut novelists and he is currently on Escalator, a talent development scheme for writers in the east of England. He has a PhD in history about descriptions of landscape in medieval France, and has worked in higher education, local government, and the NHS. He lives in Norwich.


Ethel Rohan

Ethel Rohan

With their story: 'The Sun'

Ethel Rohan is the author of The Weight of Him, a debut novel first published in the United States (St. Martin’s Press, February 2017) and forthcoming in the UK from Atlantic Books, in June 2017. The Weight of Him won the inaugural Plumeri Fellowship (US). Rohan is also the author of two story collections, Goodnight Nobody and Cut Through the Bone, the former longlisted for The Edge Hill Prize and the latter longlisted for The Story Prize. Winner of the Bryan MacMahon Short Story Award (2013), her writing has appeared or will appear in The New York Times, World Literature Today, The Irish Times, The Stinging Fly, Southword Journal, and Banshee Lit, among many other periodicals and anthologies, including The Bristol Short Story Prize Vol. 5 and the Flash Fiction International Anthology. Raised in Dublin, she lives in San Francisco with her husband and family.


Victor Lodato

Victor Lodato

With their story: 'The Tenant'

Victor Lodato was born in New Jersey. His novel, Mathilda Savitch (2009), was hailed by The New York Times as “a Salingeresque wonder of a first novel” and was a “Best Book of the Year” in The Christian Science Monitor, Booklist, and The Globe and Mail. The novel won the PEN USA Award for Fiction and the Barnes & Noble Discover Prize, and has been published in sixteen countries, including the UK (Fourth Estate). Victor is a Guggenheim Fellow, as well as the recipient of fellowships from The National Endowment for the Arts, The Camargo Foundation (France), and The Bogliasco Foundation (Italy). His short fiction and essays have been published in The New Yorker, The New York Times, Granta, and Best American Short Stories. His new novel, Edgar and Lucy, will be published in March 2017. Victor currently divides his time between Tucson, Arizona and Ashland, Oregon.


Smith Henderson.JPG

Smith Henderson

With their story: 'The Trouble'

American writer Smith Henderson is the author of the debut novel Fourth of July Creek (William Heinemann), a 2014 New York Times Notable Book. It was the winner of the 2017 Translation Prize by the French-American Foundation, the 2015 John Creasy (New Blood) Dagger Award and the 2014 Montana Book Award. It was also a finalist for the 2015 PEN Center USA Award for Fiction, the James Tait Black Prize, the Ken Kesey Award for the Novel and the Texas Institute of Letters Jesse H. Jones Award for Best Work of Fiction. The novel also made the longlists for the 2016 International Dublin Literary Award, the Folio Prize, and the VCU Cabel First Novelist Award. Henderson was awarded a 2011 PEN Emerging Writers Award in fiction, and a 2011 Philip Roth Residency in Creative Writing at Bucknell University. His short story, Number Stations, won a Pushcart Prize and a finalist honours for the University of Texas Keene Prize, where he was a Michener Center for Writing Fellow. His work has been anthologised and published in The New York Times, American Short Fiction and New Orleans Review. An accomplished screenwriter, he is a staff writer on the The Son for AMC. Born and raised in Montana, he now lives in Los Angeles, California.